Jun 25
New midwifery service in Baradine
A new midwifery service is operating in Baradine, providing antenatal and postnatal care services to local mothers and families.

The new service operates weekly and will offer care for women from local Registered Midwife, Cate Matthews.

Baradine Multi-Purpose Service (MPS) Health Service Manager, Carole Daniels said, “This is a great addition to the services we offer to our community. It’s open and appointments are available”. 

“Cate is an experienced midwife with years of experience in providing antenatal and postnatal care”.

Registered Midwife, Cate Matthews said, “I am excited to start operating this new service from Baradine”.  

“This service will work in partnership with other Health Service’s and provide support for the woman to their chosen birthing facility”. Cate said.

Baradine Multipurpose Service will remain a non-birthing facility through this change in service.  

Women wanting to see Cate for their care can contact Baradine Hospital on 68434121 to organise an appointment.   


Jun 21
Outstanding achievements recognised at WNSWLHD Awards ceremony

The Western NSW Local Health District (WNSWLHD), last night celebrated its annual Living Quality and Safety Awards.

 

WNSWLHD Chief Executive, Scott McLachlan said, “The WNSWLHD Living Quality & Safety Awards are our chance to recognise and celebrate innovation".

 

“The Awards showcase the work of our teams who strive to provide world-class health care to our patients, no matter where they are. In achieving that, we apply both evidence and ingenuity to find new and better ways to help keep people healthy, and to provide care when needed. Our Awards have gone from strength to-strength".

 

 “In 2019 we received more than 100 submissions from staff and teams across all the categories."

 

Award finalists presented their projects a Symposium held in Dubbo yesterday, allowing the innovations and achievements to be shared with health workers and managers from across the District. The Awards were presented at a function last night.

 

“We are extremely proud of the work we do. Last night I felt inspired listening to the finalists in each category". Scott said.  

 

Awards were presented to teams for project that had contribution to innovation in health care in our region along with individual awards for Staff Member of the Year, Volunteer of the Year and Collaborative Leader of the Year.

 

The Studer Group Australasia Collaborative 'Leader of the Year' Award was taken out by, Dubbo Health Service's Meg Tuipulotu.

 

Meg is a dedicated member of the Dubbo Health Service Executive team, who works tirelessly to improve the quality and safety of patient care. She also takes time to educated and mentor clinicians, managers and staff at the hospital.

 

The Cisco Dimension Data 'Volunteer of the Year' Award, was won by Orange Health Service's Robert Fabry.

 

Robert is a familiar face around the Orange Health Service, volunteering his time and knowledge in all aspects of the facility. Robert's assistance as a way finder ensures that our patients, carers and families can find their way or loved ones in hospital without feeling overwhelmed.

 

The First State Super 'Staff Member of the Year' Award, is Condobolin Health Service's Leonie Parker.

 

Leonie is a well-respected nurse not only in Condobolin but in the WNSWLHD. Leonie is on a number of committees that represent rural nurse practitioners and is a strong advocate for Women's Health. 

 

Leonie is also responsible for establishing and maintaining the only Nurse Practitioner led Colposcopy Clinic in NSW for the past seven years.

 

The SalaryPackingPLUS 'People's Choice' Award was won by Experiences in the road to recovery – Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol.

 

The Chief Executives Award was awarded to Coonamble Multipurpose Service.

 

Category Winners:

 

Category 1 - The SalaryPackagingPLUS 'Patients as Partners' Award: Winter is coming - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management on the medical ward – Orange Health Service

 

Category 2 - The Cisco Dimension Data 'Delivering Integrated Care' Award: It pays to be well connected – integrating care in Western NSW – Integrated Primary Care and Partnerships

 

Category 3 - The Clinical Excellence Commission 'Patient Safety First' Award: REACH OUT – Nyngan Multi-Purpose Service

 

Category 4 - The Employees Mutual 'Keeping People Healthy' Award: Early recognition of childhood obesity – Integrated Primary Care and Partnerships

 

Category 5 - The Amber Infrastructure Group 'Supporting Our People' Award: Virtual clinical education – Organisation Development Unit

 

Category 6 - The Spotless 'A Safe and Healthy Workplace' Award: Dubbo Health Service Work Health & Safety Team Engagement – Dubbo Health Service

 

Category 7 - The University of Sydney School of Rural Health (Dubbo/Orange) 'Health Research and Innovation' Award: 3D printing in cancer care – Cancer Services, Orange

 

Category 8 - The First State Super 'Excellence In The Provision of Mental Health Services' Award: Integrative multidisciplinary services - key towards improvement in mental health care delivery - Mental Health, Drug and Alcohol

 

Category 9 - The Macquarie Homestay 'Excellence in MPS/Rural Facilities' Award: MPS redevelopment art and signage project – Planning and Service Development

 

Category 10 - The University of Sydney School of Rural Health (Dubbo/Orange) 'Closing the Gap in Aboriginal Health Disadvantage' Award: Wellness clinic – bringing culture into health – Integrated Primary Care and Partnerships and Bathurst Health Service

 

Category 11 - 'Inspiring Team' Award: Parkes Hospital facility huddles – Lachlan Health Service and Peak Hill YEAH !!! – Peak Hill Multi-Purpose Service


Jun 14
Orange plays important role in ENZAMET trial for prostate cancer
​The Central West Cancer Care Centre at Orange Health Service has played an important role in the ENZAMET Trial for patients with advanced prostate cancer.

WNSWLHD Director of Clinical Trials Unit, Dr Rob Zielinski said, “Orange and the surrounding areas have contributed a significant number of patients to this practice changing trial”.

The results from the ENZAMET Trial was recently present at the American Society of Clinical Oncology, as one of the four plenary sessions. 

“These are given to highlight research that is deemed practice changing. More than 6000 abstracts are submitted, competing for this privilege”. Dr Zielinski said. 

“This trial and it is practice changing results demonstrate two important points. One, that the patients of regional Australia are keen to sign up to clinical trials if given the opportunity and secondly, practice changing research can be performed right here in the regional hub of Orange. The trial also highlights the fantastic work our staff in the Clinical Trials Unit in Orange – this is a real credit to them as a team”.

The take home message from the trial is that with the addition of enzalutamide with standard treatment there is a 33% less chance of dying from prostate cancer. 

This Australian-led global clinical trial has shown that hormone therapy with a drug called enzalutamide can improve the survival of some men with advanced, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.  

The five-year survival from prostate cancer in Australia is high (95%) but this mainly represents men with earlier stages of the disease. Metastatic prostate cancer is still the second-leading cause of cancer death in Australia for men after lung cancer. 

“It’s important that we undertake and fund research into new treatments, and find ways of using established treatments better”. 

“This is why it’s so important that we have a clinical trials unit in Orange. Clinical trials allow us to determine which treatments, alone or in combination, will provide the greatest survival benefits to the patients with the least adverse outcomes”. 

The Orange Clinical Trials Unit is provides fundamental access to rural patients for cancer treatment innovations such as enzalutamide and puts Orange Health Service on the map for leading this research. This is another proud moment in the Unit’s short history. “We are motivated by bringing novel treatments to the patients of our community through cancer clinical research. This trial is another example of the importance of embedding regional and rural centres (and their patients) into clinical research.”


Jun 11
Emergency skills workshop success
​Dubbo Health Service hosted 7 Emergency Skills Workshops for medical staff/rural GPs/nursing staff for the Emergency Medicine Education and Training (EMET) program. 

The emergency skills workshop aims to upskill medical staff/rural GPs/nursing staff and provides training by Dr Randall Greenberg, Director of Critical Care and Chief Medical Officer for Royal Flying Doctors Service NSW, Dr Michael Golding, Director of Emergency Care Institute, Judy Townsend, Clinical Nurse Consultant and Jody Towney, Project Support who are a part of the Dubbo Health Emergency Department staff.

More than 100 medical staff/rural GPs/nursing staff from across the Western Local Health District attended the EMET program Workshops, focu​​sing on a variety of Emergency Department Case Studies. 

Dubbo Health Service,  Director of Emergency Department, Dr Randall Greenberg said, “All locations had an extremely impressive turnout, given that some of these facilities staff only 2 RN’s, with very limited resources, they handle themselves extremely well in any given Emergency Situation”. 

An RN from Baradine Health Service gave positive feedback saying they ‘found working through the case studies helpful, good reassurance to staff’. 

Wellington Health Service Manager, Sally Loughnan said, “I would love these every few months they are so invaluable, sharing lessons learned”. 

In attendance there were GP’s, VMO’s, Medical Students, Registered Nurses, Health Service Managers, Ambulance Officers and Health Workers. 

Dubbo Health Service has received funding from the Commonwealth Department of Health and support from the peak body for emergency medicine in Australia, the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine, to run an EMET program. 

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Jun 11
Emergency skills workshop success
​Dubbo Health Service hosted 7 Emergency Skills Workshops for medical staff/rural GPs/nursing staff for the Emergency Medicine Education and Training (EMET) program. 

The emergency skills workshop aims to upskill medical staff/rural GPs/nursing staff and provides training by Dr Randall Greenberg, Director of Critical Care and Chief Medical Officer for Royal Flying Doctors Service NSW, Dr Michael Golding, Director of Emergency Care Institute, Judy Townsend, Clinical Nurse Consultant and Jody Towney, Project Support who are a part of the Dubbo Health Emergency Department staff.

More than 100 medical staff/rural GPs/nursing staff from across the Western Local Health District attended the EMET program Workshops, focussing on a variety of Emergency Department Case Studies. 

Dubbo Health Service,  Director of Emergency Department, Dr Randall Greenberg said, “All locations had an extremely impressive turnout, given that some of these facilities staff only 2 RN’s, with very limited resources, they handle themselves extremely well in any given Emergency Situation”. 

An RN from Baradine Health Service gave positive feedback saying they ‘found working through the case studies helpful, good reassurance to staff’. 

Wellington Health Service Manager, Sally Loughnan said, “I would love these every few months they are so invaluable, sharing lessons learned”. 

In attendance there were GP’s, VMO’s, Medical Students, Registered Nurses, Health Service Managers, Ambulance Officers and Health Workers. 

Dubbo Health Service has received funding from the Commonwealth Department of Health and support from the peak body for emergency medicine in Australia, the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine, to run an EMET program. 

EMET 2.jpeg


Jun 06
First child treated at new Oral Health Service in Rylstone
Child Dental Services are now available at HealthOne Rylstone, at Rylstone Multipurpose Service.

Oral Health Therapist, based at Mudgee Community Dental Clinic, Maddie Hedley, has held her first Rylstone clinic on Tuesday 21st May.

Maddie said, she enjoyed her visit and remarked on how welcoming the staff and community were. 

Maddie has a particular interest in oral health promotion and is keen to build rapport with the children she sees and encourage healthy oral hygiene routines for the whole family. 

Poor oral health affects a child’s ability to chew and can lead to disruptions to speech, sleep and reduced participation at school. It is recommended that all children have their first check up by the age of one and then regular check-ups after.

Free general child dental services, including examinations, x-rays, clean, fillings and extractions are available at the Rylstone clinic. 

There are a number of things we can all do to look after our teeth and gums: 
  • Brush your teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste, especially before bed
  • Enjoy a variety of healthy foods
  • Avoid snacking on sugary and sticky foods and drinks, especially between meals
  • Drinks lots of tap water, with added fluoride where available 
Maddie is looking forward to providing a regular dental service once a month to the children of Rylstone. Maddie’s next visit will be on Tuesday 18 June, 2019.

Children under the age of 18 are eligible for free dental treatment. To register for an appointment please ring the Dental Contact Centre on 1300 552 626. Medicare Card details are needed to register all children, so please have the card handy. 

Parents will be encouraged to consent to Western NSW Local Health District claiming any available Medicare rebates from the Child Dental Benefits Schedule. These funds are used to provide additional dental services within Western NSW, benefitting the whole community. Alternatively, children aged 0-5 can see the local Child and Family Health Nurse for a dental referral.

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May 30
Protect your lungs, live smoke free this World No Tobacco Day May 31

On World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) May 31, Western NSW LHD (WNSLHD) is highlighting the single most important step you can take to improve your health and well-being is to live a smoke free lifestyle.    
Despite declining rates of smoking in Australia, tobacco smoking remains the leading cause of disease and premature death, and is a leading risk factor for many chronic diseases. In NSW 15.2% of the population smoke tobacco, WNSWLHD has one of the highest rates of smoking tobacco of any LHD in NSW with 23.5%.
 “The 2019 WNTD theme highlights the impact of tobacco smoking on the health of our lungs, for example worsening of asthma symptoms, an increased risk of chronic respiratory disease and lung cancer”; said Health Promotion Officer, Siobahn Graham. 
“Inhaling tobacco smoke not only affects the lung health of smokers, but also the lungs of people breathing in second hand smoke. Children are particularly susceptible to the effects of second hand smoke as their lungs are still developing. This really highlights the importance of making sure we all live, work and play in smoke free environments”; said Ms Graham. 
"So many people in our community will relate to this year’s World No Tobacco Day theme,   whether you are a smoker or not. You only get one set of lungs so why risk damaging them by breathing in tobacco smoke?” 
If you or someone you know is thinking about giving up, May 31 2019 is a great date to start, and the good news is you don’t have to go it alone. Help and support is available by simply calling the Quitline on 13 78 48, or visit https://www.icanquit.com.au/​  



May 28
Take a test this HIV Testing Week
​Western NSW Local Health District (WNSWLHD) is encouraging people who have never been tested for HIV or haven’t had a test for more than a year, to get tested as part of HIV Testing Week from the 1-7th June.

NSW is continuing to progress towards the virtual elimination of HIV transmission, with the latest report finding 22 per cent fewer notifications in the first three months of 2019, than the average for the same period over the previous five years.

The NSW Health HIV Strategy Data Report shows in 2018, NSW had the lowest annual number of notifications on record. At the same time, HIV testing in NSW has continued to increase.

WNSWLHD HARP Manager, Ann Ryan said the results are encouraging but reminded individuals to get tested regularly.

“HIV Testing Week is a good reminder to get regularly tested. Men who have sex with men should get tested at least once a year and men with multiple partners, up to four times per year,” Ann said.

“Tests are available at your local GP or sexual health service. There’s also a new Dried Blood Spot testing kit which is private and discreet and there’s no need to visit a doctor. The test is delivered in the mail and results are then sent by text, email or over the phone.

“People at risk of HIV infection, particularly men who have sex with men, should also take proper precautions to protect themselves. This includes taking Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and using condoms.

In the first three months of 2019, 52 men who had sex with men were diagnosed with HIV in NSW. 52 per cent had not had a test in the past 12 months and 17 per cent had never had an HIV test.

“Getting diagnosed late can be life-threatening and increase the chances of HIV being passed on to sexual partners. Being diagnosed early means you can receive treatment and live a long and healthy life and testing is discreet, confidential and often free,” Ann said.

The NSW Government has committed $21.9 million in 2018-19 to strengthen testing, treatment and prevention with 47 state-funded Sexual Health Clinics also making testing easily accessible.

To find out where to get tested call theNSW Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624.

HIV Testing Week runs from 1 – 7 June. For more information about testing and prevention including PrEP go to: www.health.nsw.gov.au/HIV-test​.



May 27
“Yilimadha” Aboriginal Cultural Room Opening
​The Western NSW Local Health District is extremely proud to be opening the ‘Yilimadha’ Aboriginal Cultural room at the Orange Health Service. 

This is part of the Lighthouse Project that has been running at the Orange Health Service. 

The aim of the Lighthouse Project is to help close the gap in cardiovascular disease between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians through the provision of evidence-based, culturally safe care for acute coronary syndrome. With cardiovascular disease being the  leading cause of death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and  a major contributor to the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and other Australians.

Orange Health Service Lighthouse Project Officer, Mandy Debenham, said “The opening of “Yilimadha” which is our place in Wiradjuri. Is an Aboriginal Cultural room for all Aboriginal patients, family and community to meet, have some time out, and hold family meetings”.

“Yilimadha became possible through the work of the Lighthouse project. 

“When we started looking at how we could make our service more accessible to Aboriginal people, we found there was nowhere for families to meet, except in the corridor. When sorry business is happening there was nowhere private where communities can discuss issues and grieve”. Mandy said. 

Through extensive community and staff consultations we developed an appropriate name, furnishings and colour scheme. 

“The opening of the room is the start of a new journey at the hospital. It is also the end of the Lighthouse project at the Orange Health Service. The success of the project was made possible by the huge support we received from everyone across the WNSWLHD.

“I am very proud of the work has been achieved through the project and the many improvements made around patient care and improving the environment of the hospital. We have also implemented new care pathways for Aboriginal patients and cultural competence of all staff at Orange Health service”. Mandy said. 

May 20
Volunteer services breaking new ground in Western NSW
People receiving palliative or end of life care will for the first time have the option of receiving social support from volunteers in some Western New South Wales towns.
A new volunteer service in Coonabarabran was officially launched at a special dinner held in April.

It’s a collaboration between Warrumbungle Community Care and clinicians from the Western NSW Local Health District. Its primary purpose is to support people with a life-limiting illness and their carers, and those suffering the effects of social isolation.

The launch was attended by local clinicians from the Coonabarabran Primary and Community Health Centre, new volunteers, Warrumbungle Community Care staff, Councillors and others.

Palliative Care NSW, Volunteer Support Service Program Kate Bowman An opening address reflecting on how the best defense against bad dying is a robust and compassionate community was given by from the am.

Also speaking at the launch was Jane Beach, Palliative Care Project Coordinator in Western NSW LHD. She spoke about how over the last year she has been working closely with committed local residents and community organisations all over Western NSW to get new a new style of community-led palliative care volunteer services up and running.

While Coonabarabran is the first of the new palliative care volunteer services to launch, a second service will be launching in Grenfell on May 23 during National Palliative Care Week with a third service in Mudgee soon to follow. All three services have already begun taking referrals. New volunteer services operating in Orange and Dubbo are also not far away.

Alex Huntir, Manager, Volunteer Support Services Programme, Palliative Care NSW was the mastermind behind this innovative project aimed at addressing the inequities of access to community palliative and supportive care for patients and their families in end of life care. Jane Beach and Alex presented this model of community-led volunteering at the 2019 Patient Experience Symposium in Sydney last month. 

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No, this isn't actually my picture. I just haven't gotten around to updating this section. It's good to know that someone is reading every last word though. Thanks!